BIPOC Features: Machal Gradoz

One of the things that I wanted to do with Notes From the Apotheke was to amplify the voices and contributions of BIPOC scholars in ancient studies, at all levels and from all backgrounds. BIPOC in the field are invited to reflect on what brought them to studying the ancient world, as well as offer their opinions on the future of the discipline and share any work they are especially proud of or excited about.

This month’s installment of the BIPOC feature series is written by my good friend and colleague Machal Gradoz!

Machal doing archaeological fieldwork
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Roundup: BIPOC in Ancient Studies Week on Twitter

From January 10-15, I decided to host what was then called the “7 Day #BIPOCinAncientStudies Challenge” on Twitter. 

What I realize now is that it really turned out to be more of a BIPOC in Ancient Studies Week – no challenge about it, just a week of building community and amplifying BIPOC voices and experiences. I called it the BIPOC in Ancient Studies challenge because I wanted it to be more inclusive of scholars who don’t consider themselves to be classicists, but still study the ancient world.

Although we lost some momentum in the second half of the week, I think the challenge was successful overall. I hope that everyone (both those who participated and those who shared the posts) enjoyed it!

From the start of the challenge, I knew that I wanted to share the prompts from the week in a blog post. This is so that it would be accessible to those of you who aren’t on Twitter who want to think about the prompts.

The Prompts

Day One: Who/what inspired you to pursue a degree in ancient studies?

Day Two: What’s an academic accomplishment that you’re most proud of? (or if you have many, share them all!!)

Day Three: Share an article/book by a BIPOC author that you’ve found moving, profound, and/or inspiring. Here are the ones that were mentioned:

The Work You Do, The Person You Are by Toni Morrison (article)

Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge (book)

Amo, amas, amat: what’s SHE doing in a field like THAT!?” by Shelley Haley (video)

“The Classics, Race, and Community-Engaged or Public Scholarship” by Patrice Rankine (article)

Shapes of Native

“Venus in Two Acts” by Saidiya Hartman (article)

Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza by Gloria Anzaldúa (book)

Why Students of Color Don’t Take Latin by John Bracey (article)

“Relationality is not a Metaphor: Enacting Wahkohtowin and Kihokewin Through Metis archaeology” by Dr. Kisha Supernant (video)

Emergent Strategy: Shaping Change, Changing Words by Adrienne Marie Brown (book)

Day Four: We give so much of ourselves everyday that often we forget to take care of ourselves. If it’s for 5 mins or a few hours, do something for you today.

Day Five: In what way(s) have you grown since you began your journey?

Day Six: If you could have a beverage with any BIPOC scholar in the field, who would it be?

Your Turn

Feel free to contemplate these questions on your own (for the first time or again) and share them with your friends who aren’t on social media.

We didn’t get to Day Seven because, like I said, I think we were all running out of momentum. But if any BIPOC reading this feel so moved, comment below your answer to this final prompt: 

What is your one hope for the future of Classics, archaeology, ancient history, Egyptology, and related fields?